Rule Out a Presidential Run for Bobby Jindal in 2012

In This Photo: Bobby JindalBookmark and ShareOn Wednesday, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal found himself having to defend his travel schedule in the face of speculation that he has eyes on the state’s U.S. Senate seat or the even the presidency.

As for his travels, the Governor stated that 90% of his scheduled time during his first three years in office was spent in Louisiana where he visited every parish in the state on a regular basis.

Jindal assured voters that there is no shadow of any doubt regarding his intention to focus on reelection in the fall and seeing a second term in office through fully. “I lost the first time I tried to get it. People suggested I should run for the Senate. … I don’t want to be a senator. I want to be governor.” Said Jindal before adding “I have the job I want.

Jindal has done remarkably well for the state of Louisiana and since his first years in office as Governor, many people have spoken highly of his political future. In 2008 the McCain campaign vetted Jindal for the position of Vice President but Jindal claims to have to turned down the opportunity.

For his part Jindal told reporters that they will not find him in Iowa and that his future will consist of completing eight years in office as Governor and accomplishing many of the goals he has planned for the state. After that he plans on returning to the private sector to, as he put it, pay some bills.

Jindal is in fact most likely off the presidential radar in 2012 but don’t for one minute believe that a future run after 2012,in either of the two slots on the ticket, is out of the question.

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Jindal’s November Book Release Is Timed Just Right

Governor Bobby Jindal and local officials flyover

Governor Jindal Addresses BP Oil Disaster Before the Press

Bookmark and Share    It has become tradition that before you run for President of the United States, you must write a book.  The book usually plots the path that America should take for brighter and more prosperous according to its author, the future presidential candidate. Along the way, the book also often makes biographical references to the life of the future candidate and some of the events that shaped their thinking.

This has essentially become a part of the process, a sort of prerequisite that gets a perspective candidate for a presidential nomination same name ID and a basis of understanding for readers to get know all about the man or woman who will be seeking their vote.

Well it would seem that Louisiana’s first term Governor is following in this tradition.

Originally slated to come out in July, Governor Jindal’s book is now coming out in November. He and the co-author of his collection of concepts, policies, beliefs and biographical history were thrown a bit off schedule due to the Gulf Oil spoil calamity that took place earlier this year..

The timing though couldn’t be better. Soon after November’s midterm elections, once the makeup of the political landscape for the next two years is established, the presidential shuffle will begin. Republicans will begin to maneuver their way through the issues and Party leadership and start to position themselves for a run for the GOP presidential nomination. What better way to have your known thrown into the mix than have your book hit the shelves just at the moment that the discussion about the 2012 presidential election takes place.

Jindal‚Äôs presidential fortunes are not exactly as great as others are yet but he does a substantial platform from which an aggressive campaign could allow him to be quite viable in the Republican primaries. In 2008, he was ranked one of the nation’s most popular governors with an approval rating of 77%. Since then, although he took a hit from what was widely characterized as a poor national response President Obama‚Äôs 2009 State of the Union Address, Jindal has lost some of his glow, but not much. It is quite hard to maintain a 77% approval rating, a number that is normally reserved for wartime President‚Äôs. But Jindal has remained popular and his name has been out there more than most governors.

His handling of wicked hurricanes in the wake of the utterly disgraceful of Katrina by the previous Democrat Administration of Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, has helped to show Jindal to be a true leader and confident organizer and steward in times of crisis. This impression was only solidified by his handling of the BP oil gusher that produced the greatest manmade ecological disaster in U.S. history. Jindal’s stand against the Obama Administration’s slow reaction and lack of sufficient action in the wake of the rig explosion, helped to contrast Jindal’s own quick reactions and successful efforts to prevent the oil from polluting his Louisiana shores.

But in addition to proving his competence and leadership during times of crisis, Jindal has also demonstrated a steady hand of management and leadership in other areas such as the economy. As a strong fiscal conservative, Jindal has whipped Louisiana’a budget and fiscal condition into far better shape than any of his recent predecessors. Something which has not been an easy fete for a state whose largest city and greatest tourist attraction, New Orleans, is still recovering from the devastation of Katrina while also having to deal with an Obama led moratorium on offshore oil drilling that is killing jobs and the oil spill which devastated the Louisiana fishing and shrimping industries as well as coastal tourism.

In the midst of all this, is the novelty of Jindal’s personal story. He is currently the youngest Governor in America and the first ands only Indian-American Governor in the United States.

All of this can certainly make for a compelling book but is certainly an interesting story, one that can capture the hearts and imaginations of the American electorate, if told right.

After all not all stories get told properly.   After Nancy Pelosi rose to the position of Speaker of the House and became the most powerful and highest elected woman official in U.S. history, when her story was translated into a book, despite all the hype, it was an embarrassing flop that cost more to produce and promote than were made through its sales.

Whether Jindal‚Äôs book goes over big or not, there is no denying that he is making sure that all windows of opportunity remain open to him. The November release of his book is just one indication of that but his record and personal story are the real sellers when it comes to 2012 and if the sales pitch isn‚Äôt for President, can you say ‚ÄúVice President Jinda?‚ÄĚ. Northern nominees like Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Sarah Palin sure can.

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