Newt Gingrich Turns Strong Debate Performance In to a Strong Campaign Ad

Bookmark and Share   One of the most powerful performance in the recent Fox News, South Carolina presidential debate came from Newt Gingrich when panelist Juan Williams asked Newt Gingrich if past remarks he made were racially insensitive.  Few knew that what Williams was actually doing was setting the stage for a moment that Newt Gingrich would turn in to debate history.

The intentionally designed, racially charged, question was meant to put the former House Speaker on the spot and confront a sensitive issue.  Yet Gingrich automatically dismissed the premiss of the question by simply answering “no”.  Then what followed that simple word was an example of inspired oratory skill  that was an eloquent and powerful recitation of shared, basic American principles which were stated with the type of ease, conviction, and forcefulness that could only be carried off by someone who is a true believer in those principles.  They were the principles of equality and personal responsibility, principles which Newt Gingrich used to defy liberal thinking with and to  defend conservative ideology with.

Now Newt turned that moment in to a 30 second ad which will air in South Carolina [see the ad below].

It is called “The Moment” and it takes the most powerful portion of Newt’s answer to Juan Williams’ questions and turns it in to a Lincolnesque moment in history.

For me, this is the first time I have seen Newt Gingrich’s campaign coordinate itself well.  It is the first time he has taken a positive event for his candidacy and build upon it in any meaningful way.

Up to now, Newt has failed miserably at maximizing opportunities.  This time he didn’t.

The new ad not only reminds those who saw the debate from which the Gingrich speech in the commercial comes from, but it affords those who did not see it, the opportunity to be inspired by his words the same way that the audience who heard those words live did.

Between the lack of time left in the campaign and the lack of money available to Newt, I am not sure if this ad will be seen by enough people to make the difference between first and second place in South Carolina, but it is  probably the best chance Newt has at making sure his campaign stays alive for even just a little longer.

For those of you who missed the debate that this “moment” comes from, below you will find the entire segment, including the question from Juan Williams which inspired Newt Gingrich’s inspired answer.

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Rick Santorum Warns Republican’s :You Can’t Fight The Sesame Street Lobby.

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Former Pennsylvania Senator and potential 2012 Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum stated Tuesday that the Republican’s attempt to cut funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, who among others operates PBS and NPR, was largely futile due to the opposition that will be presented by the “Barney” and “Sesame Street” contingents who wholly support the CPB.

Republicans have named the CPB, which provides funding to public radio and television stations, as one of their proposed budgetary cuts

“When I came to Congress, I was one of the guys that said we gotta cut the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. It wasn’t necessary anymore,” Santorum said. “The ‘Barney‘ contingent came out and the ‘Sesame Street‘ contingent came out, and these are programs that are popular among families and so they hit you pretty hard.”

NPR has come under fire recently for it’s firing of liberal correspondent Juan Williams for an opinion he gave regarding fear when seeing a person in Muslim garb on an airplane. The comment was made on the popular Fox News program The O’Reilly Factor. Williams firing was seen by many as retribution for his working with Fox News rather than his comments. The publicity surrounding the incident put NPR, and it’s public funding, back in the spotlight.

I for one am under the belief that if the programming is good and there is a solid base of listeners and viewers, there is no reason that the private broadcast corporations won’t pick them up. Regardless of the “Sesame Street Lobby” Republicans should continue to push for cuts of non-essential budgetary spending. If everyone loves Barney……he should be just as able to support a spot on MSNBC. Don’t they have an open time slot?

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