From one radical to another?

Just how radical is Rick Santorum?  Yes, it is very frustrating that the media will ask this about Rick when they completely ignored any sign of Obama’s radicalism or the radicalism of many of the Democrats in Congress.  But that is what separates conservatives from liberals.  Conservatives don’t seem to actually want a candidate who appears too radical.  We have this unhealthy fear of independents and moderates.

Not so with Obama.  Obama has no fear of those middle of the road voters as demonstrated by his decision to force religious institutions to to pay for abortions.  In fact, it’s been a long three years so many might not remember that one of the first things Obama did in office was reverse the United States’ Mexico City policy making it so that our tax dollars are going to pay for abortions overseas.  Obama’s latest budget is textbook tax and spend liberalism.  Instead of funding our military, Obama’s budget cuts funding for our troops and adds funding to buy off radical Islamic groups in the middle east.

Is Rick Santorum as radical as advertised in comparison?  There is no question that Santorum is a very conservative Christian.  There is no question about whether he has been paying attention in church for the last 20 years.  Santorum may or may not use contraception, but would he really ban it?  One thing is for sure, he wouldn’t make catholic charities and institutions pay for it.

There is a candid interview circulating liberal circles because of some things Santorum says about his social conservative values.  In the interview he also talks about the limited size of the Federal government, but most liberal bloggers are ignoring that part.  Santorum also talks about moving more funding to the states and decentralizing of the government.

Santorum is not nearly as radical as Obama because Santorum does not believe the government is the answer to everything.  However, Santorum does have an unhealthy view of the government’s role in encouraging the traditional family.  Santorum would do what every politician before him and likely every politician after him would do and would use the tax code to encourage the traditional family and the bully pulpit to keep the national conversation going on the way a family should be.  Basically that puts Santorum in the same class as every politician except Ron Paul and Rand Paul.  But don’t expect a flat tax from Santorum.

Part of Santorum’s problem is that his bully pulpit is easily mistaken for gestapo type policy advocacy where government officials would enter people’s homes and steal their condoms lest they have sex with their spouse for any reason other than procreation.  Let’s get real.  Santorum is not Obama.  I doubt he will have websites where you can report your friends who disagree with him.

Santorum may make it easier for states to ban abortion.  Since when is that not a plus for conservatives?  Oh yeah, since we became scared of the moderates and independents.  Just a refresher for my conservative friends, abortion can be the brutal, torturous death of a human being.  Best case scenario, it is the end of a human life.

I don’t agree with Santorum on some social issues.  The question is, when Santorum talks about what he believes, is he saying what he will do as President or simply what he believes to be true?  Obama doesn’t say what he believes on the campaign trail, then he forces his beliefs on the country.  Santorum needs to be clearer about what he will implement as President.  In this interview he says many things that liberals have jumped on, but at 24:04 Santorum gives a key response to the question of what his ideas about education would look like on the federal level.

“It wouldn’t happen on the federal level.”

He needs to say that more.

 

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Independence Day. It’s More Than Just a Day at the Beach


Bookmark and Share   On this day in 1776 was born a concept that blossomed into a government that founded the greatest nation in the world.  The concept of a government that believed freedom came first and that government’s main purpose was to defend our freedoms,  inspired a force that brought an end to tyranny and gave birth to a Republic that became a beacon of hope for the world.

The celebration of our nation’s birth is not partisan.  It is a celebration shared by us all.   Yet as we struggle with the responsibilities that come with freedom, there exists a partisan divide regarding how we proceed to keep our nation strong.  For me though, there is no question about the direction we must go in.  I believe that the very concepts and principles which gave birth to our nation, are the very principles and concepts that we must adhere to.   That direction is found within the conservative ideology.

As evidence, I would like to present the arguments once made by one of my political heroes,  a former member of the House of Representatives named John Ashbrook.

On the topic of overegulation, Ashbrook once wrote;

“This nation was founded on a number of principles. One of the main ones was the concept of limited government.

The virtues of limited government seem to have been forgotten by many political leaders. Government bureaucracy has grown. Regulations stifle more and more aspects of life. Regulation by government has taken on awesome dimensions. Proof of this can be seen in the regulatory agencies.

Federal agencies have steadily grown in number, in size, in complexity, and in the number of regulations issued. Just stop and think for a minute. There are so many agencies: EPA, FCC, FPC, FTC, ICC, EEOC, OSHA, CAB, CPSE, FAA, and the SEC. And this is only a partial list. I am sure that if you gave a few more seconds of thought, you could easily add another half dozen to the list.”

Ashbrook’s statement was not intended to commemorate our nation’s birth, but on its birthday, those words offer us a reminder of why we became a nation and what our government is supposed to be about.  The statement was made several decades ago, yet Ashbrook’s contention that the virtues of limited government  have been forgotten by many political leaders, still applies today.  Especially in the case of our President.

More government means less freedom.  Yet today, while we celebrate our independence, our political leaders are burdening us with more government and less freedom.  To debate the issue, the dynamic of left versus right, liberal versus conservative, Democrat versus Republican, is inevitable.  But if one were to base the argument on the principles that founded this nation, the debate is not as much left versus right as it is right versus wrong.  Many may disagree and at times such basic ideological differences can become heated and create greater divides than they should.  But on this day we can all unite in celebration of  the fact that thanks to the limited government principles that created us, we are free to disagree.  For that we thank God ……and America.

Is it me?

Donald Trump is on to something. Trump was on the Rush Limbaugh radio show today during Rush’s annual Leukemia Lymphoma fundraiser, and Rush mentioned that the most recent poll has Trump in the lead. That’s when Trump said this: “I don’t know if it’s me or the message…”

The Donald may recognize that many consider him to be about as serious a candidate as Sarah Palin, Michelle Bachmann, or Ron Paul. On the other hand, conservatives are eating up Trumps no nonsense, pro-America, anti-Obama message.

It is the same

Do people love Trump? Or what he stands for?

message that brings tens of thousands of people to Palin rallies and has conservatives who don’t take Paul seriously as a Presidential candidate standing and applauding when he speaks and admitting great respect for him. It’s a message of a strong country, low taxes, low spending, limited government, and free markets. But is it electable?

“Mainstream” candidates tend to temper their rhetoric and take veiled jabs at one another while punctuating their sentences with political buzzwords like compromise, bipartisan, together, and of course, both sides are equally to blame.

But besides TEA Party favorite Republicans, there is another candidate in 2012 who has taken a no non-sense, partisan approach to elections. In fact, while giving only minimal lip service to bipartisan togetherness, the Democrat’s sole 2012 candidate has given us such phrases as “if they bring a knife, we’ll bring a gun” and has filled his campaigns and Presidency with partisan rhetoric. Barack Obama, even while being portrayed as a sort of political messiah who would unite our country, took no issue with blaming the nation’s problems on Bush, even as he continued many of Bush’s policies.

We may all wish that the nation was united and that politicians could just magically work together and fix things the right way, but in all honesty there are incredibly clear lines of demarcation between the left and right. This leaves the right with a serious question: do we campaign the way we have been told to and pretend the next President can unite the country? Or do we show the kind of confidence in conservatism that Trump, Palin, Bachmann, Paul, and other popular, not serious candidates are using to draw the masses and win polls?

The Democrat in 2012 has found his confidence in extreme liberalism.

Tim Pawenty’s TEA Party Patriots Summit Speech

Bookmark and Share As recently reported here in Whit House 2012, former Minnesota Governor and future presidential candidate Tim Pawlenty “rallied the TEA Party” at a TEA Party Patriots summit held in Arizona. Now we would like to show you that speech in the speech below this post..

Much of the speech is a stump speech given at the many events he has been hitting. But with lines such as “the Constitugtion was not written to imit freedomm. It was written to limit government”, Pawlenty is honing his message to those who consider themseves a part of the TEA movement.Given that the TEA Party and its agenda is embraced by the G.O.P., the strategy is a good one and he is carrying it out well.

Currently Pawlenty is not a top tier candidate among the TEA Party, but with spoeeches like this, he soon can be.

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