Romney’s Reality. Make His Move Now or Risk Waiting Till It’s Too Late?

Romney has to keep some players off the field

Bookmark and Share   As indicated by a recent Rasmussen Reports National Republican Primary survey of 1,000 likely primary voters, since making his expected presidential candidacy official last month, Mitt Romney is solidifying his perceived hold on frontrunner status. The poll gives him a 14% lead over the rival who since Monday’s debate, is now his closest rival, Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann. The actual results of the poll are as follows; Romney – 33%, Bachmann – 19%, Cain –10%, Gingrich – 9%, Paul – 7%, Pawlenty – 6%, Santorum – 6%, Huntsman – 2%

This is good news for Romney, but at this early stage in the game, voter’s are quite fickle. They have yet to really focus on a decision that some won’t have to make for another 9 months and most won’t have to make for almost a year from now. So many of these people are going with Romney because he is a name that remains well known ever since he first ran for President in 2008. But among activist Republican voters, their familiarity with Romney does not make him a clear frontrunner. The biggest reason for that is his creation of the Massachusetts healthcare plan that President Obama claims was the model for his unpopular national Obamacare plan. This crack in Romney’s shell is the major reason behind why many Republicans are hoping that a knight in shining armor steps into the race and saves the day, or rather the election.

For some that savior is Sarah Palin. For others it’s Rick Perry, Chris Christie, or Rudy Giuliani.

While another Giuliani presidential candidacy ultimately won’t have much impact, the other three names would. Christie, Palin, and Perry have a style, reputation and record that it takes to be popular with the anti-government sentiments of the TEA Party age. Giuliani really doesn’t. Additionally, if he had what it takes, he would be well positioned for the nomination as either the incumbent Governor of New York or United States Senator representing the state..

Ever Since 2000, when Hillary Clinton ran to replace Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Rudy was the premier New York Republican and the first and only name New York Republicans had a chance to win with. Yet since 2000, Rudy was not up to running and as a result, Republicans lost two gubernatorial elections, and twice as many chances to win a U.S. Senate seat. If Rudy was not up to beating names like Elliot Spitzer, Chuck Schumer and the virtually unknown Kirsten Gillibrand in statewide races, he is certainly not up to beating names like Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney or Barack Obama on a national level.

However the prospects of a Christie, Palin, or Perry candidacy could go far. And more importantly, they could go a long way in preventing Romney from getting the Republican presidential nomination.

This forces Mitt Romney to confront that reality and requires his campaign to make a critical strategic decision.

Romney already has his hands full with the competition he is getting from the current field of declared candidates. While the candidates were quite civil with one another and focused on what they agree on during the most recent debate, soon they will be focusing on their differences. And the most glaring difference between Romney and the rest of the field is that none of them have created a government-centric healthcare plan that President Obama adopted. No matter how much Mitt tries to frame the issue as a states rights issue that he handled appropriately as a Governor but would never think of handling the same way as a President, for many he will continue to have big-government blood on his hands. Still, among the seven major candidates that he will definitely be running against, Romney has a fighting chance. But if Rick Perry were to join the field, Romney’s fighting chance quickly becomes a major uphill battle.

For that reason, it behooves Romney to solidify his frontrunner status now.

If Romney was able to take what is currently at best, a tenuous hold on the top spot and turn it into a solid hold on the top spot, than Rick Perry and others who have been showing a real or perceived reluctance to run, will be less likely to do so.

Up to now, Romney has been attempting to lay relatively low and avoid the type of national overexposure that could cause people to get tired of him and peak too early in the long nomination process. Right now Romney is content with tirelessly meeting with and talking to relatively small organized, individual groups of influential Republicans and Republican activists and trying to win them over. Such a strategy is a necessity for any candidate. But it will not make Romney seem unbeatable quickly enough to prevent stiff competition from announcing their candidacy and sucking the gas out of Romney tank.

So Mitt needs to decide whether he wants to run a slow and steady campaign that builds momentum gradually or if he is willing to make some moves that risk early overexposure but discourage others who have a good chance at beating Romney from becoming candidates. One of those moves that Mitt might want to think about is renouncing the “Providing Access to Affordable, Quality, Accountable Health Care” that he enacted in 2006 as Governor. If Romney could come forward and describe Romneycare as a proper attempt by a state to experiment with a solution to a tough problem, and then admit that the experiment failed, he could begin to convince apprehensive, limited government voters that he gets it.

Romney has come close to this. In speech after speech, he has articulated that his state healthcare plan was not perfect and that there are things he would now do differently. But coming close to admitting that Romneycare was a failure is not good enough. What he needs to do is admit that his Massachusetts healthcare plan did not do the job he had hoped it would and then go as far as to say that it once and for all proved to him that government is not the answer.

If Romney were to go this route, he would have the breathing room to explain that he lived up to his responsibilities as a Governor and allowed his state to with its own solution to its own problems. He would then be able to get milegage by explaining that the difference between him and President Obama is that unlike the President, he understands the difference between the role that a Governor plays in their own state and that a President should play in the governance of a state. The key is convincingly making the point that his healthcare experiment as a Governor, will make him a President who is more convinced than ever that government is not the answer.

This argument would fly among limited government and TEA movement voters. Not only would it be plausible, it would begin to unwrap the healthcare albatross from his neck.

But that alone will not be enough to prevent Governors who did not make the same mistake in their states that Romney did in his, from entering the race and challenging Romney. To accomplish this, Romney needs to make an investment in a national  blitz that exploit’s the economic malaise that President Obama is entrenching us in and highlight Romney’s understanding of the economy as well as the private sector and the successes he has had in the private sector. Romney needs to quickly acquire a stronger national image as a master of free market based growth, who knows how to create jobs, and as was the case in the 2002 Winter Olympics, turn things such as our economy, around. This impression must become undeniably obvious and to do so, Romney can not just create this impression in New Hampshire and Iowa. To prevent someone like from Rick Perry from challenging him, they need to see that states which hold primaries and caucuses later in the contest, also have an undeniable positive image of Romney. Romney may even want to think about taking advantage of some sketchy polls that show that Perry is currently behind others Republican presidential hopefuls among Texas  Republican primary voters.

Romney’s private sector background and managerial talent is his strong suit and if he can act quickly to exploit the continuous reports of an economy that is actually getting worse, he can turn that strong suit into the type of armor that will discourage others from challenging him. That will then leave Romney to compete among an existing field of candidates who will have a hard time replacing Romney as the frontrunner.

This strategy is unorthodox. Traditional campaigns for a presidential nomination force candidates to focus on the individual state contests that can keep them in the game till the next state primary or caucus. Usually the strategy is to win enough early state primaries and caucuses to force opponents to drop out of the race and leave the nomination to them. But for Mitt Romney, as it is now, he will have a tough time winning Iowa, the first contest, and South Carolina, the third contest. And if he does not do well in Florida which holds its primary shortly after, then Romney may be in trouble. This scenario makes it enticing for someone like Rick Perry to become a candidate. Unlike Romney, Perry could easily win Iowa and South Carolina. In fact, if Perry were to run, he is the one candidate with the greatest chance to win enough early contests to force others, inluding Romney,  out of the race.

For that reason, Romney may want to make his move now rather than later. Because if Rick Perry runs, later may be too late for Mitt Romney.

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Bookmark and Share Were it not for the existence of his Massachusetts Healthcare plan that was seen as a precursor to Obamacare, Mitt Romney would not only be the clear frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination, he would be a candidate with all the enthusiasm and buzz around him. However, the fact that Romney adopted for his state, a healthcare plan that is anathema to conservatives, prohibits Romney from having a clear path to the Republican presidential nomination. But is this fair and can it really seal Romneys fate? Not only can it seal his fate, it could seal the G.O.P.s fate in the 2012 general election.

In the battle for the Republican nomination, opponents of Mitt Romney will use Romneycare against the former Massachusetts Governor like a lethal weapon. They will use it to undermine Romneys credibility on every level. They will use it to raise doubts about his commitment to everything from free markets and small government, to conservative values and his political integrity. Those challenging Romney will pile his creation of a government-centric solution to healthcare in Massachusetts on to his flip-flops and depending on how well they define Romney, most of his campaign will be spent having to defend ground instead of gaining ground.

And this will not come from just any one opponent. It will come from all of them. It may even be used by former Governor and Ambassador to China, Jon Huntsman, a moderate, as means to make himsel a bit more appealing to conservatives by claiming that he does not believe in big government solutions.

For his part, Romney has tried to preempt the attacks. Even though he has yet to make his candidacy official, Romney has offered up several major speeches to defend the albatross of Romneycare that hangs around his neck and he has used just about every other speaking engagement to raise the issue and defend his position. But these attempts to remove the issue from his opponents weapons cache have failed. Debilitating doubts about Romneys ideological purity continue to build. This weak point in Romneys armor makes him vulnerable to other attempts to assassinate his character. They make it easier topaint Romney as being politically disingenuous and lacking any sincerity.

As was pointed out in the campaign against him in 2008, Mitt has had a change of heart ona number of issuessuch asabortion. Romney once defended Rowe vs. Wade until he became a right-to-life opponent of it. But the list of things he can be accused of changing his mind on seem to grow and grow. On gun rights Romney went from supporting a ban on assault weapons to opposing any bans on the right to bear arms. On campaign financing he once said I would like to have campaign spending limits only to latergo on record saying “The American people should be free to advocate for their candidates and their positions without burdensome limitations.

On their own, some of these positions and statements may not be damning eneough to dash Romney’s presidential hopes, but when combined, they can be used to convincingly paint Mitt Romney as an insincere politician with no commitment to his beliefs. With the backdrop of Romneycare, such attacks have not only a good chance of sticking, they have a good chance of derailing Romneys candidacy.

But what if in between good strategy and a well financed campaign, Romney were to somehow still finagle enough delegates to win the Republican presidential nomination?

I still believe that Presidetn Obama’s liberal-socialist agendahas proven himself to be too ideological extreme and that the single issue of the economy will still make it possible for Mitt Romney to defeat the President. Buteven I, a 2008 supporter of Romney, believe thatthe former Massachuisetts governorhas painted himself so tightly in a corner that despite how vulnerable President Obama is and will be, the Presidents campaignhas a good chance to make mincemeat out of Romney.

Thanks to the window of opportunity to exploit doubt about Romneys ideological purity that was created by Romneycare, Governor Romneys record of both words and deeds is so vulnerable to attack and distortion, that even President Obama can shape a campaign that makes himself look like a man of undisputable principle and character when compared to Romney. Such an impression of Romney is most definetly innaccurate but well orchestrated campaigns can make false impressions seem like facts. Still though, Mitt Romneys vulnerabilities in this area are so exposed, that the Obama campaign has a good opportunity to distract the foucs away from the issues , which happen to be where the campaign could really be won or lost. Instead, with Romney as the Republican nominee, the Obama reelection campaign will have a clear path to creating a campaign that can distract us from his losing suit.the issues, and force us to focus on Romneys character and a perceived lack of trust that we can have in him and his word.

These are basic concepts that, as indicated by the video below, Democrats have already thought of.

Such videos come from one of the major arteries of a good campaign.opposition research. And whether we realize it or not, Democrats have been doing plenty of opposition research for President Obamas reelection campaign ever since he was sworn in to office as President. Unfortunately for Mitt, since his own performance in the 2008 nomination contest, the once , likely chance of his being the 2012 nominee, forced Democrat and Obama operatives to do more opposition research on Romney, than anyone else. That means they probably have more ammunition to use against him than they do on anyone else.

Still, Mitt Romney is determined to win the Republican presidential nomination and the presidency. Unfortunately, that determination is likely to make the Republican presidential contest an extraordinarily negative one. If Romney is to survive past any of the early primaries and caucuses, he will find himself in a position of having to equal the playing field that his opponents are on. So in addition to playing his defensive game, in order for him to gain any yards of his own, he will also have to play a strong offense. That means he will be forced to throw as much dirt as he can against those who would get ahead by the doing the same to him. In the end, such a process will not be helpful for Republicans. It will ultimately weaken the final ticket and undermine the potency of the issues we could use against the President in the general election.

Even thoughthis is all quite possible, there still remains the possibility for Romney to win both the nomination and the White House. As a result of who doesnt run for the Republican presidential nomination, if he can defend himselff romthe attacks against him in a straightforward, dignified, and believable way, Romney could win the nomination by default. Once that happens, his own opposition research may discover ways to severely undermine the character and trust of President Obama as much as the President wil undermine Romneys. Such an equalization of the playing field in the general election would make theelection a choice between the lesser of two evils. Combine that witha convincingly conservative appraoch to the economyand a path to prosperity that is more realistic than President Obamas, may be enough to win. But even that path to victory for Romney is going to be quite difficult to achieve. The sting of Mitt’s Romneycare creation in an election where Obamacare is both an actual and ideologically symbolic centerpiece,can be strong enough to insprirea conservative oriented, Tea Party-like candidateto mount a Thid Party candidacy. That will only benefit President Obama.Bookmark and Share

Romney Hanging Metaphor Gave the Media the Rope to Hang Themselves With

Bookmark and Share At a Friday night Americans for Prosperity event in New Hampshire, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, in an attempt to lay blame where blame is due, spoke of hanging the old 1980 misery index around the neck of President Obama in regards to the miserable economy of the past few years. As seen in the video below, he said:

You remember during the Ronald Reagan/Jimmy Carter debates? That Ronald Reagan came up with this great thing about the misery index, and that he hung that around Jimmy Carters neck, and that had a lot to do with Jimmy Carter losing. Well, were going to have to hang the Obama Misery Index around his neck

The Governor went on to say;

And, Ill tell you, the fact that youve got people in this country, really squeezed, with gasoline getting so expensive, with commodities getting so expensive, families are having a hard time making ends meet. So, were going to have to talk about that, and housing foreclosures and bankruptcies and higher taxation.

Then he added; Were going to hang him uh, so to speak, metaphorically with, uh, with, uh you have to be careful these days, Ive learned that, with an Obama Misery Index.”

Since those remarks, the unbiased mainstream media has tried to incite racial tensions as a means to denigrate the tentative frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination. With headlines like Mitt Romney Suggests its Time to Hang President Obama and Romneys Comment on Hanging Obama Sparks Controversy,the lamestreammedia has begun to act like bloggers seeking to make a name for themselves by pushing the limits of truth and twisting facts. And the media’s actionswarrant the need to make the point that the only reasonRomney’s remarks became controversial, was because the media intentionally interpreted them to be controversial. The episode raises the question of who is really at guilt here and what are they guilty of?

Is Mitt Romney guilty of suggesting that Americans should hang the President? Is he guilty of suggesting that Caucasians should resort to the horrors of racist lynch mobs that would hang African-Americans from tree limbs? Of course not. The statement was metaphorical, not literal. For his part, it is true that Mitt Romney made a mistake here. But his mistake was not that he made some sort of Freudian slip that revealed some deep-rootedracial sentiments. His mistake was that he gave the lamestream media the opportunity to create that perception? After the words came out, the Governor did realize that they would be taken out of context by the left and he clarified the context in which he used the metaphor.

But that did not prevent a hit man-like media from running with headlines intended to fan the flames of racism in order to put the heat on Mitt Romney and insinuate that he is a bigot. The truth is that if the African-American half of our Presidents racial makeup was an issue or something Mitt Romney had a problem with, he would have been more careful so as to not drop any hints of prejudice. But the fact is, Mitt Romney is not seeing color when it comes to the President. What he is seeing are the problems being exacerbated by our President. And it is those problems which Romney was addressing, not President Obamas color.

It’s clear that Mitt Romney is not the one guilty of anything here. Any existing guilt in this situation must be placed on the media. They are the ones who instead of reporting the news, tried to create the news. They are the ones who intentionally tried to interpret Romney’s words to be racially divisive.

One online news source, The Examiner, writes;

The use of imagery which involves a “misery index” noose being put around President Obama’s neck seems insensitive to say the least, and will surely be called downright offensive by some.

To deny that there is any truth in that statement would be a lie, but at the same time, pushing headlines that try to visualize the hanging metaphor for readers along racial lines is disingenuous. In fact, it is more than that. It is dangerously irresponsible. And at the same time, there is a severe pot calling the kettle black (pun intended.hang me) syndrome going on here. Lest we forget President Obamas hang-ups with race. Did he not describe White Democrats in rural Pennsylvania as follows;

“It’s not surprising, then, they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren’t like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations.”

Or how about his direct reference to typical white people when talking about his Caucasion grandmother and said:

She is a typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn’t know, you know, there’s a reaction that’s been bred in our experiences that don’t go away and that sometimes come out in the wrong way, and that’s just the nature of race in our society.”

And how can we ever forget the great Beer Summit which was a necessary meeting to relieve racial tensions after President Obama stated “The Cambridge police acted stupidly.”, before he knew the circumstances that surrounded the arrest of a black professor.

Then there was President Obamas attempt at humor when he tried to describe his poor bowling game to that of the abilities of handicapped youth in the Special Olympics.

The point is both sides can and do play this game of gotchya. And there will always be occasions when people phrase things less than perfectly, especially people who spend10 to 14 hours a day, constantly in the spotlight, while discussing issues, giving speeches, and answering questions. This does not mean that people should not take responsibility for their words. They must. But it is not the job of the media to twist words. If anything, as a supposed non-partisan entity, they have a responsibility to clarify the meaning of the words spoken by those that they cover, no muddle them.

As for this latest brouhaha, despite some who are trying to hang Mitt Romney with his metaphorical mishap, his campaign will survive. This is not the end to his race for the White House that some sources have tried to suggest. But it is another nail in the coffin of trust that the public has for todays biased news media.

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Romney Salutes the Tea Party. Maybe He Does Know He Needs Them

Bookmark and Share In the following guest column for the Orlando Sentinel, Mitt Romney marks Tax Day by tipping his hat to the TEA Party movement for creating the first true popular, post-WWII movement to cut taxes and limit the size of government.

Up to now, Romney has bewildered many with what seemed to be his keeping the TEA Partyat arm’s length. In a post entitled “Romney’s TEA Problem“, Icriticized him for such bad judgement. But it would seem that he is at least ready to acknowledgethem and credit them for their mission and cause. It’s about time. Now Mitt better prove to them that he gets it and that he is on the same page of them. RomneyCarehas made TEA Partiersquite reluctant to embrace him but if he can continue to echo the message he did in the following column , he just might be able to get some TEA Party people solidly behind him.

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“There’s some good news and some bad news as we mark the unhappy occasion of the April 18 tax filing deadline. Let’s start with the good news.

For the first time in the post-World War II era, there is a significant popular movement to scale back government and reduce the tax burden that has been stifling our economy. A lot of this is because members of the Tea Party are making their voices heard.

Almost 21/2 centuries after the original Boston Tea Party of 1773, the idea of limited government that inspired our forebears is very much alive. The growth of government is not some inexorable force. In a democracy, we the people decide. Thanks to the Tea Party, there’s real hope that we can rein in our profligate federal government.

But in order to make progress, we have to first rein in President Obama, whose spending binge is driving our national debt to historic highs. When Obama took office in 2009, the national debt was about 50 percent of the Gross Domestic Product. Over the past two years, our national debt has risen to about 70 percent of the GDP and is expected to be 100 percent of the GDP by 2020.

The Obama administration’s $800 billion stimulus package is one-half of the unfolding disaster. The other half is Obamacare, which will cost more than a trillion dollars unless it can be repealed something the next president must make a priority on Day 1 in office.

These staggering new burdens are made worse by the fact that our system of taxation is killing our nation’s once-strong economic engine. The mind-boggling complexity of our tax system is only part of the problem. As of last year, the U.S. tax code had mushroomed into 71,684 pages that no one human being can fully understand. Along with complexity comes a dizzying array of perverse incentives.

For example, we tax companies that make money overseas if they want to bring the money home, but we don’t tax them if they keep it abroad. The result is that as much as a trillion dollars in private capital is parked offshore. With proper incentives, that money would be infused into our economy and invested in new equipment and factories. Repatriating a trillion dollars could create lots of good, permanent, private-sector jobs.

Then there are the disincentives that flow from the high rates themselves, for entrepreneurs, small business owners and other job-creators. American employers bear the highest tax burden in the world, tied with Japan and above even European countries like Italy and France. But instead of making ourselves more competitive by reducing rates across the board, we’ve created myriad loopholes that are confusing to everyone except the lawyers, accountants and lobbyists who make a living off them.

We have also built a paralyzing uncertainty into our system. In December, Congress and President Obama agreed to temporarily extend the Bush tax cuts. But under the terms of the congressional compromise with the White House, high rates will come back into force in two years unless Congress acts again. Every entrepreneur, every small business owner and every employer knows that the clock is ticking. This uncertainty translates directly into caution about investing and taking on additional workers.

A smart tax system would reward investment, savings and entrepreneurship, while providing job-creators with the predictability and stability they need to grow our economy. But our tax system is not smart; it’s quite the opposite. It needs urgent reform that reduces rates and restores a climate of confidence in our economy. With millions of Americans seeking but not finding work, a transformation of our approach to taxes is both an economic and moral imperative.

But reform requires both understanding and leadership. Unfortunately, when it comes to those qualities, we are facing Washington’s biggest deficit of all.”

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Mitt Romney Makes It Unofficially Official

Bookmark and Share Today Mitt Romney announced that he is forming his 2012 Presidential Exploratory Committee. Although Romney has been planning a run ever since he pulled out of his 2008 candidacyfor the Republican presidential nomination he hasmadeit a point to put off making a 2012 run official for as long as possible. Last time around, Romney essentially began his campaign in January of 2007. This time around, Mittis taking advantage of the name ID that he already establishedand trying to back loadhis campaign as much as he can. The thinking is that voters will quickly become weary of many candidates who are in their face for too long.

ButRomney has decided that now is the time to get the ball rolling with the prerequisite exploratory committee that most all contemporary candidates enter in to.The move also allows him to start raising money directly for hispresidential campaignrather than just his Political Action Committee, Free and Strong America PAC.

In his announcement, which the video of can be found below, Romney states “It is time that we put America back on a course of greatness, with a growing economy, good jobs and fiscal discipline in Washington,”.

Romney is currently a very slight front-runnerfor the GOP presidential nomination. In many ways he is perfect. Having only held office by his own volition for four years as Governor of Massachusetts Romney can not be considered an insider, yet his leadership in executive office does give him experience, a quality that many trust. But at the same time, his great experience comes from the private sector where Mitt has been a successful businessman, who has helped launch other succesful businesses such as Staples.

Were it not forRomneyCare, his Massachusetts healthcareplan which many compare to ObamacareRomney would be the undisputedfrontrunner, butMitt’s government-centric healthcareplan makes many find him a little hard to swallow, especiallyin a presidential campaign that is expected to make running against Obamacare, a central theme.

Still, Mitt Romneyisin the front of the pack.White House 2012’s monthly ranking of the Republican presidential contenders has had Mitt ranked number one for thepast three months in a row, and manymainstream political prognosticators place him there as well. So while it will not be easy, Mitt will be a tough candidate to beat and right now he is “the” candidate to beat.

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Romney on Obamcare; Why Didn’t the President Ask Me?

Bookmark and Share This past weekend, Mitt Romney addressed the Republican JewishCoalition in Las Vegas. His speech, which can be linked to and seen below this post, offered up a potential president who is well versed, competent, personable and passionate. Directly out of central casting, the nearly perfect Mitt Romney, blasted President Obama and his Administration for a litany of bass ackwards foreign, domestic, and economic policies.

From the Presidents decision to demand that Honduras reinstall the Marxist President who was kicked out of office for violating the constitution, to his silence when dissident voices in Iran rose up to demand to freedom, and his throwing away of our missile defense systems in Europe to appease the Russians, Mitt Romney called the President out for keeping our allies at arms length and giving the enemies of freedom a free ride He describedObama’s foreign policy as wandering. On the economy, Governor Romney blamed the President for deepening and lengthening the recession” we are in by seeking a domestic policy that created a level of uncertainty that forced investors and entrepreneurs to hold back and wait to see where the dust settled. Unfortunately though the Administrations pursuit of things like Cap-and-Trade, Obamacare, Card Check and a host of other misguided, left leaning, programs did little to build confidence and has stymied economic growth.

One of the most compelling things to reveal themselvesin Romneys address, came during the question and answer period, when he was asked to contrast Obamacare with the healthcare system thathe adopted in Massachusetts when he was Governor. Upon being asked the question, Romney, very tongue-in-cheek, said thank you, thats the first time Ive been asked that question. But after breaking the ice, Romney explained that whether we like it or not, we have socialized medicine. He said that when someone is in a car accident or similarly traumatic event and they are injured, we do not refuse to take them to the hospital and care for them if they dont have insurance. He explained if they don’t have healthcare, we all end up paying for their care. He then went on to say, that in Massachusetts, they found that many people, even those with affordable healthcare plans available to them, refused such plans because they knew that “free” healthcare was available to them.

Romney offered several other contrasts, and admitted that there is much he would change in regards to the Massachusetts healthcare plan, but he insisted that he would never impose a one-size-fits all healthcare policy on all the states and deny them their rights. But the most interesting tidbit turned out to be the strategy that he is using to respond to President Obama on this issue. of healthcare reform.

At late, President Obama has made it pretty clear that he would rather not have to try to run for reelection against Mitt Romney, He would much rather have a Sarah Palin or Haley Barbour as his opponent. And Romney is everything that Obama is not. He has over 25 years of experience in the private sector, governed a state, run an entire Olympics and is as about as squeaky clean a candidate that anyone could find. In addition to that, he is telegenic and an almost perfect candidate. Few other potential opponents can start a camping against the President from a position stronger than Romney.

The Presidents campaign team knows this. That is why he has begun to take aim at Romneys Achilles heal.Romneycare. The Obama Administration’s hope is that they can give Mitt Romney credit forNational helathcareby inventing Romneycare, which the President can claim was a precursor to Obamcare. The President also knows that such credit will help keep Romney from becoming the Republican presidential nominee and result in the nomination of a Republican that the President will have a better chance at beating.

This posturing before the campaign has now forced Mitt Romney to say that he looks forward to a healthcare debate with the President. In fact, he claimed it would be fun. Romney explained;

Of course he [President Obama] does me the great favor of saying that I was the inspiration for his great plan, Ill say, why didnt you call me? Why didnt you ask what was wrong? Why didnt you ask if this was experiment, what worked and didnt work? And I would have told him what I know.

The response has some merit, but probably not enough to totally satisfy the conservative and TEA movement base which will still hold his government-centric, bureaucracy based, state healthcare program against him and be forever doubtful of Romneys commitment to free enterprise. But in the meantime, even though the primaries have not begun and the national conventions have not yet put forth their presidential candidates both President Obama and Governor Mitt Romney are already playing a game of general election strategy. Both men are looking at, and expecting to be running against each other in the general election. And while there are a few if any similarities between the two men, the one thing that they do share in common is the one thing that could blow up in both their faces..Romneycare and Obamacare.

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New Hampshire Straw Poll Puts Candidate Karger in First Place

Bookmark and ShareThis past Thursday evening first time presidential candidate, Fred Karger won the St. Anselm College Republican Straw Poll. College Republican President Brock Weber announced the results to a room full of participants at the famous New Hampshire Institute of Politics after voting ended at 9:00 pm. The straw poll was conducted all week on the campus of this conservative Catholic College located in New Hampshire’s largest city.

Karger was the only presidential candidate or potential presidential candidate to have addressed the gathering but his win was still a surprise and an indication of just how little a lock anyone has on the nomination at this stage in the game. Of course this straw poll is not neccessarily a good indication of the opinion of New Hampshire voters. The pool of voters in this poll were of a specific age group and many students attending the college from other states, are not even eligible to vote in New Hampshire. But a win is a win and in this case it was a pretty significant one for Fred Karger.

The final results were as follows:

  • Fred Karger, 79 Votes
  • Mitt Romney, 74 Votes
  • Donald Trump, 26 Votes
  • Tim Pawlenty, 24 Votes
  • Ron Paul, 24 Votes
  • Rudy Giuliani, 22 Votes
  • Rick Santorum, 20 Votes
  • Sarah Palin, 9 Votes
  • Herman Cain, 8 Votes
  • Gary Johnson, 8 Votes
  • Mike Huckabee, 8 votes
  • Newt Gingrich, 7 Votes
  • Haley Barbour, 3 Votes
  • Mitch Daniels, 2 Votes
  • John Bolton, 1 Vote
  • Rand Paul, 1 Vote
  • Other, 6 Votes

Although all straw polls are little more than beauty contests, a win like this for a virtual unknown can help boost his name ID and increase the viability of Karger’s candidacy as time goes by. It will also help his case when it comes to being included in future Republican presidential debates.

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