Sarah Palin Tells Chris Wallace What “President Palin” Would Do

Bookmark and Share   I have stopped predicting who will enter the race for the Republican presidential nomination. After seeing names like Pence, Thune, Barbour, and Huckabee, all shy away from a bid for the nomination and after being convinced that Mitch Daniels would run, only to find out that he won’t, I have stopped trying to figure out what any other potential candidates will do. This is especially so concerning former Alaska Governor and vice presidential nominee, Sarah Palin. Pain is a master at throwing people off guard. She relishes her ability to befuddle the media that tries to follow her every move and she holds her cards close. However, in a rather extensive 25 minute interview with Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday, Governor Palin sounded like someone prepared to challenge President Obama in 2012.

Palin came across as calm, cool, and in command of the issues. Her opinions were also presented in a way that made her come across as a  populist with a common sense conservative approach to the problems being denied by our President, but understood by the people.

In one of her brightest moments of the interview, Sarah hit Democrats and the President on the economy and said;

“Their [the Democrats]plans for bigger government, more federal control over our private sector, more regulation and burdensome mandates on the people, and on our businesses, its not working and we need to shift gears and change course.  And it is very noble of President Obama to want to stay at the helm and maybe go down with the sinking ship, but I prefer,…… many Americans prefer…… that we start plugging up the holes, powering up the bilge pump, and start to get rid of this unsustainable debt that is sonking our ship.”

Palin sounded most like a presidential candidate when host Chris Wallace asked the former vice presidential nominee, “What would President Palin do, specifically, to boost the economy?

Without any hesitation, Palin simply said that she “would go in the opposite direction of what these Democrats and President Obama have tried in these past 2 ½ years.” But as she continued her answer, at about 4 minutes, 10 seconds into the interview, she stated,

“What President Palin would do is cut the federal budget….making sure that we’re not crowding out private sector investment. And we will cut that spending”

Another telling point came when Wallace pointed out that Palin and Bachmann are both popular TEA Party figures as well as social conservatives and as such, asked Palin  if there was room for both her and Bachmann in the race, or would they split the same base of support between them?

Here , Sarah Palin gave a response that may have offered a “between the lines” interpretation indicative of her sense that she fully expects to become a candidate.

Palin stated;

“No, we have differences too. I have many years of executive experience too, and she has her strengths to add to the race. But no, yeah, there is certainly room. The more the merrier. The more competition, the better.”

That segment of the interview can be found at almost the very end of the video at about 23 minutes, 30 seconds in to it.

While I once leaned towards believing that Palin was not going to run for President, the last month has made me begin to think that she might actually go for it. For a while, she was suspiciously absent from the political scene as she laid relatively low. For me, that was a sign of Palin preparing for something big and trying to not overexpose herself too early. Now, while Palin vigorously argues that she is simply celebrating our American history, her recent bus tour for that  purported purpose, offers up an oddly timed, campaign-like experience, that affords her valuable attention.

Now we can add to that this nearly half hour long interview, an interview in which Palin talks about decisions that would come from a “President Palin”, and discusses room in the race for her and other candidates, so matter-of-factly, that it almost sounds as though she is welcoming candidates to challenge her for the nomination. But I am still not getting my hopes up.

The positive potential that I believe exists in a Palin presidential candidacy is endless. In 2008, I was part of a movement to nominate her for Vice President and became one of the happiest people in the world of politics when she actually was nominated. I believe it was the only smart decision made by John McCain and his campaign. However; I do admit that since then, Palin has been somewhat marginalized by a vindictive, liberal element and relentlessly brutal media. To a degree, her image was damaged and her negative ratings surpassed her positive ratings. But I also believe that if Sarah Palin can transition from playing the role of Republican cheerleader to Republican statesman, she could easily turn those ratings around. All Palin needs to do is come across a bit more Thatcher-like than pop star-like, and she could easily become America’s “Iron Lady”.

This latest interview was a step in that direction.

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Bookmark and Share On Monday, Sarah Palins website, Sarah PAC, was spruced up and transformed from a rather bland, one page, lackluster site occupying web space, into a multimedia platform with information, news and links. The move is prompting many to believe that Palin is in fact readying for a run for President. The revamped website comes on the heels of what was a battle cry of a speech for commonsense conservatism that she gave in Wisconsin on Saturday. That speech alone, prompted many to change their minds about what they though Sarah would do. But the combination of the two has really upped the speculation about a presidential candidacy.

From the previous lack of coordinated moves that would usually signal one preparing to run for President, I had begun to think that it was slightly more than likely that Sarah Palin was not running for President in 2012. Yet Palins desire to continuously make sure that she stakes a high visibility position on every major issue of the day has me too unsure to place any bets against her running. But with Palin you just never know. I have even thought that she could possibly be working on her own time schedule because she never intends to run in the Republican primaries and caucuses. I have thought that Palin could possibly be preparing to build herself up as the ultimate anti-establishment candidate and run for President as an independent candidate. Maybe even running as a TEA Party candidate. I still dont put it past her to do that, but it is not very likely.

But therein lies the intrigue that is Sarah. You can never quite be sure what Palin is going to do. This is a woman who as Governor, kept her pregnancy a secret until the baby was practically born. This is the same woman who stunned the political world when two years in to her term, she abruptly resigned from the office of Governor of Alaska so that the business of Alaska could proceed without the interference of endless frivolous lawsuits that came with the spotlight she after being nominated for Vice President. And to most people even that was a surprise. So Sarah Palin is full of surprises. She likes it that way. It allows her to make decisions and think them through long before the media pounces. Those surprises also make it possible for Palin to completely own entire news cycles and push all other events off the front page. In many ways she is a PR genius.

Polls currently have Palin in the middle of the pack and tracking shows that her approval ratings have been making a U-Turn in the wrong direction. But one should not assume that such things will deter Palin from running. Those numbers can easily be turned around. And if she sees a field of Republican candidates that does not have an electable prospect who does not say it like it is and doesn’t shares her anti-establishment beliefsand desire for a truly limited government, with less spending and less taxes, than she will run. Sarah will jump in to fill that void. At the moment, with no truly clear favorite in the running, that void is there and so long as it remains, so will the potential for a Sarah Palin presidential candidacy.

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